Global News, January 13, 2013

Presenting news from around the world…………

From Costa Rica……

Demand for Bulletproof Kids Clothes Soars

For the last 22 years, Miguel Caballero’s Columbian factory has produced bullet proof clothing for adults.  Primarily, the clothing was sold to politicians who reside in the Middle East and Latin America.  The company never produced bullet proof clothing for children.  Following the Sandy Hook Elementary massacre, they were flooded with requests for bulletproof child size clothing.  Until the Sandy Hook massacre I had never heard of bullet proof backpacks for kids.  I wrote about companies that produce backpacks for children here: Bulletproof Backpacks for Children.  So, now back to school shopping means that parents can buy bulletproof clothing and bulletproof backpacks.    

 

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From Mali……

France Bombs Malian Islamic Forces for 3rd Straight Day

Despite the American media’s lack of reporting, there is in fact, a war going on in Africa.  Islamic forces are fighting in several countries.  France is sending an estimated 500 French soldiers to ‘assist’ the Malian military in their fight against Islamic militants.  The French military has also been bombing the Islamist positions.  France is justifying their military intervention by saying that they are protecting the large French expatriate community living in Mali. 

 

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From Australia……

Australia Continues to Battle Wildfires

The country of Australia is in the midst of a terrible fire season.  Wildfires are being fought throughout Australia.  Extreme heat and drought caused by climate change, created the conditions necessary for fires to rage across the country.  Last week, Australia’s largest astronomical observatory was damaged in the fires. 

As a side note to this story, this article is from the Sidney Morning Herald.  Click the link to see a startling difference between American newspapers and their counterparts from around the world.  The section that this story is in is called: Environment.  One of the categories in the Environmental section is: Climate Change.  Yes, that’s right, a section in a major newspaper that is actually titled: Climate Change.   Here are some of the stories currently being covered in the Sidney Morning Herald’s, Climate Change section:  Risks of Economic, Ecological Collapse, Climatechange Denial Feels the Heat, and Delay Climate Action--and Pay.

Real journalism is not something that most Americans experience very often.  See what journalism looks like when it is actually practiced? 

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From Brazil……

Brazil to Open First Public/Private Prison

Few would argue that Brazilian prisons are a source of pride for the country.  The prisons suffer from violence, overcrowding and a recidivism rate of approximately 70%.  Since 1995, the prison population in Brazil increased by nearly 150,000 inmates.  Just as America discovered, when more inmates are created then more prisons must be created.  Unlike America, Brazil has long avoided turning their prison system over to for private operations.  However, that might soon be changing.  Brazil has now opened their first public/private prison.   This is a very interesting article about a topic (the penal system) that needs to be discussed more within the progressive community. 

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From Azerbaijan……

Azerbaijani Genocide Memorial to Open to Public

Most people are aware of the Armenian genocide.  Beginning in 1915 and continuing for several years, the Turkish government embarked on a policy of genocide against the Armenian people.  While exact figures have never been determined it is likely that a minimum of 1.5 million people were murdered.  What few people are aware of is that while the Armenians were themselves being killed, they were killing the people of Azerbaijan in their own effort to create a ‘Greater Armenia’. 

Self determination should be a fundamental human right.  Big fish eats the little fish is not a way to move humanity forward. 

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A little more on the war in Mali

LaEscapee's picture

From Juan Cole
 

France, ECOWAS intervene in Mali to Halt Advance of Radical Fundamentalists

 

Under a United Nations Security Council resolution
authorizing the use of force to support the Mali government, the
Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS) had planned an
intervention with some 3000 troops. It will mainly be a Nigerian force,
with Senegal, Burkina Faso and Niger also pitching in 500 men each.
The idea was to train the Malian army to defend its own country, which
meant that no offensive was originally envisaged until September. The
advance south of the fundamentalists forced Hollande’s hand. He is
likely getting pressure from Algeria and other neighbors of Mali to do
something before the radicals march into the capital and then have a
whole country from which to launch further attacks. Hollande said he
considered Ansar al-Din a threat not only to Mali and its neighbors but
to France and Europe. It responded by threatening France. ECOWAS now
says that a few hundred troops will be deployed to Mali immediately.

 

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If you are going to Beijing, DON'T BREATHE!

type1error's picture

Beijing Orders Official Cars Off Roads to Curb Pollution

Beijing ordered government vehicles off the roads as part of an emergency response to ease air pollution that has smothered China’s capital for the past three days, while warning the smog will persist until Jan. 16.

Hospitals were inundated with patients complaining of heart and respiratory ailments and the website of the capital’s environmental monitoring center crashed. Hyundai Motor Co. (005380)’s venture in Beijing suspended production for a day to help ease the pollution, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

Official measurements of PM2.5, fine airborne particulates that pose the largest health risks, rose as high as 993 micrograms per cubic meter in Beijing last night, compared with World Health Organization guidelines of no more than 25. Long- term exposure to fine particulates raises the risk of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases as well as lung cancer, according to the Geneva-based body.

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