Gender Prison: White House taken to task over LGBT job protections

The Washington Post Editorial Board published an opinion essay on Sunday in favor of employment non-discrimination: How to protect gay workers

Historically...

IN THE politically charged election year of 1996 — the same year the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) passed both houses of Congress with veto-proof margins — the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) reached the Senate floor and was defeated by a single vote.

One might have thought that in the 17 years since then, some sort of progress might have been made on that front. One certainly would have thought it would have progressed faster than marriage equality.

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Chronic Tonic- Prisoner Of Franklin Avenue

My Dad is pissed off.  About what, you ask.  Well, one never knows what out of any number of things will set him off throughout the day.  But believe me, you do not want to be in his path when it happens.  For instance, last week during a seemingly innocuous discussion of Whopper Wednesday, Dad mentioned that each time we partake in this fast food festivity, it cost him 25 bucks.  Now, I don't why, but for some reason a giggle managed to bubble up and escape from me.  Suddenly, I found myself in the room with Joe Pesci: "What? That's funny to you?"
 

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Hellraisers Journal: "All honor to the martydom of Louis Vasquez!" Oxnard Beet Workers' Union

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Thursday August 6, 1903
From The International Socialist Review: Solidarity in Oxnard, California, Part II

This story went mostly uncovered last spring. And, therefore, we were happy to find this good account of the struggle by John Murray Jr. which was published this month in the Review. Parts III & IV will be presented over the next two days.

Part II- "All honor to the martydom of Louis Vasquez!"

Almost as soon as the union was formed, Major Driffel, manager of the Oxnard sugar factory, asked that a committee confer with him. It was done, and the following significant sample of conversation which took place was opened by the major with this question:

"I want to know the object of your organization?"

"The object," said Secreary Lizarraras, "is to keep the old prices. The Western Agricultural Contracting Company cut prices to control the business and we could not compete."

"You have a perfect right to do so," replied the Major, "but I have heard that you have a scale of prices which is detrimental to the interests of the farmers, and the interests of the farmers are our interests, because if you raise the price of labor to the farmers and they see they cannot raise beets at a profit, we will have to take steps to drive you out of the country and secure help from the outside — even if we have to spend $100,000 in doing it."

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Hellraisers Journal: Mother Jones on her way to assist Michigan Copper Strikers

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Wednesday August 5, 1903
From The International Socialist Review: Solidarity in Oxnard, California, Part I

This story went mostly uncovered last spring. And, therefore, we were happy to find this good account of the struggle by John Murray Jr. which was published this month in the Review. Parts II-IV will be presented over the next three days.

Part I-Unity between Mexican and Japanese Beet Workers

He who may not agree with the conclusions arrived at in the telling of this bit of California's history, should at least value the facts narrated — for they are surely pregnant with meaning to those who study the history of the labor world.

The town of Oxnard is in Ventura county, about sixty miles north of Los Angeles, and was founded by the American Beet Sugar Company, in which Henry T. Oxnard is the central figure. On the evening of March 24, of the present year, the Associated Press dispatches announced that there was "riot" in Oxnard — that the Japanese and Mexican unions were terrorizing the town, shooting and killing peaceable non-union men, whose only desire was to exercise the right of American citizens and work for any wage they chose...

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Out and About in the Trans World

It's always a big risk to publish an article in which you link to articles you wish people would read. After all, they may forget to return to look at the remaining links. And, of course, they may neglect to Rec and comment.

But I'm willing to take that risk…in the hopes that some will access the articles I've linked to and expand their knowledge base.

There aren't enough days in a month for me to keep up with all the stories I think people should be aware of dealing with the transgender community, its members, and our issues. So think of this as me trying, perhaps in vain, to catch up.

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Hellraisers Journal: A Bill of the Rights for the Homeless?

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Tuesday August 4, 1903
New York City - New York - Mother Jones Receives an Answer from the President

Oyster Bay, N.Y.,
August 1, 1903
Mother Jones,
Ashland House,
New York, N.Y.
Dear Madam-
I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 30th ult., and state that it has been brought to the President's attention.
The President, as was shown by his action while Governor of New York, has the heartiest sympathy with every effort to prevent child labor in factories, and on this matter no argument need be addressed to him, as his position has been announced again and again.
Under the constitution it is not at present seen how Congress has power to act in such a matter. It would seem that the States alone at present have the power to deal with the subject.
Very truly yours,
B.F. Barnes
Acting Secretary to the President

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Sunday Train: The Triboro RX & the G Train to the Brooklyn Army Terminal

A transit rail corridor plan has been taken off the shelf, dusted off, and tossed into the NYC Mayoral Race, and according to Alon Levy, the circumstances are enough to disqualify Christine Quin, one of the leading candidates:

According to Capital New York, leading mayoral contender Christine Quinn has just made up a price tag of $25 billion for Triboro, while claiming that paving portions of the right-of-way for buses will cost only $25 million. This is on the heels of city council member Brad Lander’s proposal for more investment in bus service. The difference is that Lander proposed using buses for what buses do well, that is service along city streets, and his plan includes bus lanes on major street and what appears to be systemwide off-board fare collection. In contrast, Quinn is just channeling the “buses are always cheaper than rail” mantra and proposing to expand bus service at the expense of a future subway line.
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But the reason Quinn is unfit for office rather than just wrong is the trust factor coming from this. She isn’t just sandbagging a project she thinks is too hard; the MTA is doing that on its own already. She appears to be brazenly making up outlandish numbers in support of a mantra about bus and rail construction costs. Nor has anyone else proposed a Triboro busway – she made the logical leap herself, despite not having any background in transit advocacy. Politicians who want to succeed need to know which advocates’ ideas to channel, and Quinn is failing at that on the transit front. If I can’t trust anything she says about transit, how can I trust anything she says about the effectiveness of stop-and-frisk, or about housing affordability, or about the consequences of labor regulations?
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Update 2: Quinn admitted the mistake on the rail plan, and revised the estimate of the cost down to $1 billion, but sticks to the bus plan and its $25 million estimate.

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Hellraisers Journal: Trying to live on minimum wage: "We are slowly dying."

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Monday August 3, 1903
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - National Civic Federation unable to settle textile strike.
An attempt by the National Civic Federation to settle the textile strike has failed. Under the proposed agreement, the textile workers would return to work at 55 hours a week, and wages would be negotiated later. The manufacturers refused this offer.

Strike leaders say that there are still 55,000 on strike. An attempt was made by the manufacturers to restart the mills this morning, but that attempt was unsuccessful.

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Williams Institute releases study on transgender military service

The Williams Institute has released a new study: Still Serving in Silence: Transgender Service Members and Veterans in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey. The study was drawn from the data collected from the previously released National Transgender Discrimination Study, in which 6450 transgender people took part in an extensive survey performed by the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force and the National Center for Transgender Equality.

The Williams study, performed by Jack Harrison-Quintana and Jody L. Herman, found that 20% of respondents had served in the military, as compared to 10% of the US general population.

This study finds that transgender veterans experience substantial barriers in these areas and also experience high rates of family rejection and homelessness.

--the Williams Institute

Despite the repeal of 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell,' this study highlights the ongoing discrimination faced by transgender people who serve in the military.

--Jody Herman

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