Hellraisers Journal: Abominable Camp Conditions for California Hop-pickers!

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Wednesday August 12, 1903
Cripple Creek, Colorado - The Strike of the Western Federation of Miners in "Full Swing"

One after another the mines are shutting down: at Independence, Ajax, Findley, Vindicator, and more. The Portland is running for now while negotiations continue. Charles Moyer, President of the W.F. of M. made this statement:

There seems to be no reason for a prolonged struggle, as the Standard Mill matter is a small one which should be easily adjusted. It was simply a demand of the union men of the district that their brethren of Colorado City should be paid fair and living wages.

Govenor Peabody made this statement:

If an emergency arises I shall be prompt to order out the troops in the Cripple Creek district.

However, the Governor indicated that he was not expecting trouble from the miners.

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Sunday Train: The Myth of Baseload Power

In Baseload power is a myth: even intermittent renewables will work, Mark Diesendorf, Asst. Professor and Deputy Director of the Institute of Environmental Studies at the University of New South Wales (Australia), writes:

The old myth was based on the incorrect assumption that base-load demand can only be supplied by base-load power stations; for example, coal in Australia and nuclear in France. However, the mix of renewable energy technologies in our computer model, which has no base-load power stations, easily supplies base-load demand. Our optimal mix comprises wind 50-60%; solar PV 15-20%; concentrated solar thermal with 15 hours of thermal storage 15-20%; and the small remainder supplied by existing hydro and gas turbines burning renewable gases or liquids. (Contrary to some claims, concentrated solar with thermal storage does not behave as base-load in winter; however, that doesn’t matter.)

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Hellraisers Journal: Colorado Western Federation of Miners, The Strike Call

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Tuesday August 11, 1903
Cripple Creek, Colorado - The Official Strike Call by the Western Federation of Miners

This is a copy of the official strike notice issued by the Western Federation of Miners which called the miners out on strike yesterday:

The Call
All members of the Western Federation of Miners and all employees in and about the mines of the Cripple Creek district are hereby requested not to report for wok Monday morning, August 10, 1903, except on properties shipping ore to the Economic mill, the Dorcas mill at Florence and the Cyanide mills of the district.
BY ORDER OF DISTRICT UNION NO. 1.

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Hellraisers Journal: Hop-pickers martyred in Wheatland, California & Mass Arrests Follow

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Monday August 10, 1903
Cripple Creek, Colorado - Western Federation of Miners On Strike Once Again!

The deadline for Charles MacNeill, manager of the Standard Mill, to rehire the smeltermen fired for joining the union has long since come and gone. The smeltermen resumed their strike on July 3rd, and today the W.F. of M. called out all of the miners who provide ore to the the Standard Mill. In a great show of Solidarity with the smeltermen, the miners laid down their tools and headed for the picket line.

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Who says we have no sense of humor?

I've always believed that one cannot survive transition without the ability to laugh at the situations one finds oneself in.

So when, as frequently has happened, someone tells me I just need to get a sense of humor, I am a bit taken aback. I have a well-endowed sense of humor. Perhaps the problem is that what was said or done just wasn't funny.

So anyway, I ran across something interesting recently.

The Switch was originally going to be a webseries. Due to a change in funding, it is now the pilot for a television series.

The Switch is a magical-realist transgender comedy, one that delights in pushing the envelope and in holding a queer & quirky mirror up to our own lives. And at the heart of it all is Sü, the weird experiences she has, and the people she shares them with.

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Transgender Life in the US Military

Brynn Tannehill has been a guest author at The New Civil Right Movement this past week, writing about transgender people in the military. She published articles on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.

Tannehill is a former Navy pilot and also writes for the Huffington Post.

On Monday she published the title essay, After DADT: Transgender Life In The United States Military.

Most people, including many within the LGBT community (including some very prominent LGBT leaders), were or still are unaware that the end of DADT did not end the exclusion of transgender people from military service. There is no law preventing transgender individuals from serving. However, being transgender is still grounds for “rejection for military service.”

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Hellraisers Journal: Michigan Western Federation of Miners Publishes First Issue of Miners' Bulletin

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Sunday August 9, 1903
Oxnard, California - A Summary of the Sugar Beet Workers' Strike

In summary, then, this strike began in February of this year, and was led by the Japanese-Mexican Labor Association, the first agricultural union in the state of California to achieve Solidarity across the color line. The alliance began with 500 Japanese workers and 200 Mexican workers.

On February 11th the union was founded with Kosaburo Baba as President, Y. Yamaguchi as Secretary of the Japanese branch, and J.M. Lizarras (we find various spellings for the name of this fellow worker) as Secretary of the Mexican branch. The union soon grew to include 1200 members, nearly 90% of the beet workers in Ventura County.

The strike was over working conditions and wages. The men were being cheated by the Western Agricultural Contracting Company which was being used by the sugar beet industry in that area...

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Hellraisers Journal: Solidarity! Better to go to hell with your family than to heaven by yourself.

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Saturday August 8, 1903
From The International Socialist Review: Solidarity in Oxnard, California, Part IV

This story went mostly uncovered last spring. And, therefore, we were happy to find this good account of the struggle by John Murray Jr. which was published this month in the Review. Part IV completes the series.

Part IV - "Better go to hell with your family than to heaven by your self."

Frightened at the turn things had now taken, Major Driffel, of the Beet Sugar Company, asked for a joint meeting of committees from the unions, the farmers and the company. The first day's conference came to nothing, but at the second meeting the employers realized that they were facing a labor trust that had cornered all the available labor power in the valley, and so the men's scale of prices was agreed to, with an additional pledge that all the idle union men would be immediately employed. Twice, after this, the company tried to import a carload of scabs from Los Angeles — even going so far as to lock the last shipment in its car and receive them at the station with armed guards — but each time the new men joined the union as soon as they reached Oxnard — the last lot escaping from the car windows...

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Fashion Writer B. Scott sues BET and Viacom for gender discrimination

B. Scott accepts the descriptor "transgender."

Transgender is the state of one’s gender identity (self-identification as woman, man, neither or both) not matching one’s assigned sex (identification by others as male, female or intersex based on physical/genetic sex).

--Wikipedia

It is by that definition that I accept and welcome the ‘transgender’ label with open arms.

--B. Scott

Scott is suing BET and Viacom for the treatment received while Scott was serving as Style Stage Correspondent for the 2013 BET Awards Pre-Show. Scott refers to the event as an "unfortunate incident."

It is also by that definition that BET and Viacom willingly and wrongfully discriminated against my gender identity during the 2013 BET Awards Pre-Show.

Let’s be clear — I’m suing BET and Viacom for a true public apology and to be fairly remunerated for the time lost, humiliation and emotional distress this entire situation has put me through.

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Hellraisers Journal: "The red flag was the first flag hoisted at Lexingington!" Mother Jones

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Friday August 7, 1903
From The International Socialist Review: Solidarity in Oxnard, California, Part III

This story went mostly uncovered last spring. And, therefore, we were happy to find this good account of the struggle by John Murray Jr. which was published this month in the Review. Part IV will complete the series and will be presented tomorrow.

Part III- Striking Beet Workers horrified but unafraid.

The unarmed union men were horrified but not frightened. They pursued and captured the fleeing Arnold, and, after disarming him, handed him over to the police. Sheriff McMartin himself told me that if it were not for the protection afforded by the union leaders, Arnold would have been hung on the spot. In twenty minutes the whole affair was over. No arrests were made, because none but "strike breakers" were guilty of assault, and the next day the daily press all over the country broke out with scare heads telling of the "Riot in Oxnard."

Proof of the complicity of the town and county officials was quick to follow. The place of holding the inquest was twice changed from one town to another — making the summoning of witnesses a most difficult feat — and the dead man's body hurriedly given to the unions on two hours notice in such a decayed condition that immediate burial was necessary, thereby attempting to prevent the public demonstration of a big funeral. But in spite of this most vile scheme, nearly a thousand men escorted the body to its grave. Japanese and Mexicans, side by side, dumb through lack of a common speech, yet eloquent in expressions of fraternity, marched with uncovered heads through the streets of Oxnard. On the hearse was a strange symbol to Western eyes, a huge lotus flower — an offering from the Japanese union...

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