Out and About in the Trans World

It's always a big risk to publish an article in which you link to articles you wish people would read. After all, they may forget to return to look at the remaining links. And, of course, they may neglect to Rec and comment.

But I'm willing to take that risk…in the hopes that some will access the articles I've linked to and expand their knowledge base.

There aren't enough days in a month for me to keep up with all the stories I think people should be aware of dealing with the transgender community, its members, and our issues. So think of this as me trying, perhaps in vain, to catch up.

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Hellraisers Journal: A Bill of the Rights for the Homeless?

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Tuesday August 4, 1903
New York City - New York - Mother Jones Receives an Answer from the President

Oyster Bay, N.Y.,
August 1, 1903
Mother Jones,
Ashland House,
New York, N.Y.
Dear Madam-
I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 30th ult., and state that it has been brought to the President's attention.
The President, as was shown by his action while Governor of New York, has the heartiest sympathy with every effort to prevent child labor in factories, and on this matter no argument need be addressed to him, as his position has been announced again and again.
Under the constitution it is not at present seen how Congress has power to act in such a matter. It would seem that the States alone at present have the power to deal with the subject.
Very truly yours,
B.F. Barnes
Acting Secretary to the President

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Sunday Train: The Triboro RX & the G Train to the Brooklyn Army Terminal

A transit rail corridor plan has been taken off the shelf, dusted off, and tossed into the NYC Mayoral Race, and according to Alon Levy, the circumstances are enough to disqualify Christine Quin, one of the leading candidates:

According to Capital New York, leading mayoral contender Christine Quinn has just made up a price tag of $25 billion for Triboro, while claiming that paving portions of the right-of-way for buses will cost only $25 million. This is on the heels of city council member Brad Lander’s proposal for more investment in bus service. The difference is that Lander proposed using buses for what buses do well, that is service along city streets, and his plan includes bus lanes on major street and what appears to be systemwide off-board fare collection. In contrast, Quinn is just channeling the “buses are always cheaper than rail” mantra and proposing to expand bus service at the expense of a future subway line.
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But the reason Quinn is unfit for office rather than just wrong is the trust factor coming from this. She isn’t just sandbagging a project she thinks is too hard; the MTA is doing that on its own already. She appears to be brazenly making up outlandish numbers in support of a mantra about bus and rail construction costs. Nor has anyone else proposed a Triboro busway – she made the logical leap herself, despite not having any background in transit advocacy. Politicians who want to succeed need to know which advocates’ ideas to channel, and Quinn is failing at that on the transit front. If I can’t trust anything she says about transit, how can I trust anything she says about the effectiveness of stop-and-frisk, or about housing affordability, or about the consequences of labor regulations?
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Update 2: Quinn admitted the mistake on the rail plan, and revised the estimate of the cost down to $1 billion, but sticks to the bus plan and its $25 million estimate.

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Hellraisers Journal: Trying to live on minimum wage: "We are slowly dying."

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Monday August 3, 1903
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - National Civic Federation unable to settle textile strike.
An attempt by the National Civic Federation to settle the textile strike has failed. Under the proposed agreement, the textile workers would return to work at 55 hours a week, and wages would be negotiated later. The manufacturers refused this offer.

Strike leaders say that there are still 55,000 on strike. An attempt was made by the manufacturers to restart the mills this morning, but that attempt was unsuccessful.

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Williams Institute releases study on transgender military service

The Williams Institute has released a new study: Still Serving in Silence: Transgender Service Members and Veterans in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey. The study was drawn from the data collected from the previously released National Transgender Discrimination Study, in which 6450 transgender people took part in an extensive survey performed by the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force and the National Center for Transgender Equality.

The Williams study, performed by Jack Harrison-Quintana and Jody L. Herman, found that 20% of respondents had served in the military, as compared to 10% of the US general population.

This study finds that transgender veterans experience substantial barriers in these areas and also experience high rates of family rejection and homelessness.

--the Williams Institute

Despite the repeal of 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell,' this study highlights the ongoing discrimination faced by transgender people who serve in the military.

--Jody Herman

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Summers: Economic Inequality a Problem, but not the Fed Chair's Responsibility

Well, OK, I'm summarizing. I was startled to read at Agent Orange that Summers was a progressive thinker because Summers recognizes the massive increase in economic inequality that has taken place over the past three or four decades:

It would be, however, a serious mistake to suppose that our only problems are cyclical or amenable to macroeconomic solutions. Just as evolution from an agricultural to an industrial economy had far reaching implications for society, so too will the evolution from an industrial to a knowledge economy. Witness structural trends that predate the Great Recession and will be with us long after recovery is achieved: The most important of these is the strong shift in the market reward for a small minority of persons, relative to the rewards available to everyone else. In the United States, according to a recent CBO study, the incomes of the top 1 percent of the population have, after adjusting for inflation, risen by 275 percent from 1979 to 2007. At the same time, incomes for the middle class (in the study, the middle 60 percent of the income scale) grew by only 40 percent. Even this dismal figure overstates the fortunes of typical Americans; the number unable to find work or who have abandoned the job search has risen. In 1965, only 1 in 20 men between ages 25 and 54 was not working. By the end of this decade it will likely be 1 in 6—even if a full cyclical recovery is achieved.
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There is no issue that will be more important to the politics of the industrialized world over the next generation than its response to a market system that distributes rewards increasingly inequitably and generates growing disaffection in the middle class. ...

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US Senate IP Caught Defacing Edward Snowden's Wikipedia Entry

156.33.241.5 is registered to United States Senate

Usually the only wiki we associate with Edward Snowden is WikiLeaks. However, in a hilarious turn of events, an IP address linked to the United States Senate was caught defacing Edward Snowden's Wikipedia article last evening. The "less than neutral" edit was to change the lead sentence from this:

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Hellraisers Journal: The little fellow cried, "Don't make me scab! I'll die first!"

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Sunday August 2, 1903
From The Comrade: Part II of "Child Slaves of Philadelphia" by John Spargo

One of the effects of child labor, the illiteracy of adults, I have observed here and in the surrounding towns and villages to a much greater extent than anywhere else in this country. It is by no means an uncommon thing to meet native born Americans of twenty-five years of age, or over, unable to read or write even their own names! What a terrible price to pay for the folly and crime of child labor!

Of course, the first break in the ranks of the strikers took place among the children. Poor children! they entered upon the strike with light hearts. To them it meant a chance to rest; to straighten their little backs. But they were in most cases easily browbeaten by the brutal bosses or their agents. I heard of several cases where mothers took their children — literally dragged them — to the mill gates and forced them inside to "scab." One little fellow I heard of was dragged and beaten by his mother right up to the mill door when he was roughly pulled inside by a bully of a foreman who hurled a volley of curses at the cowering child.. And the burden of the little fellow's cry was "Don't make me scab! I'll die first! Don't make me scab!"

Morally Philadelphia seems to be quite dead. There seems to be no means of rousing it to a sense of shame. "Corrupt and content" in political affairs, it is cruel and content in industrial affairs. Only now, among the textile workers themselves, is there any sign of moral revolt against the infamy of robbing the children of their childhood for profit. There are numerous "reform" societies in the city; there is no dearth of churches or preachers; there is an oversupply of "charitable institutions." But here, as elsewhere, only a small, but happily growing, band of workers — a few Socialists and others whose consciences have been quickened by Socialist propaganda — dare protest against the ruthless slaughter of the children. They alone affirm the right of every child to a free, unhindered access to life's riches of health and joy.

One morning recently I saw a group of small children gazing with awed reverence at the old "Liberty Bell" in the historic "Independence Hall." One little girl of perhaps nine or ten summers had evidently been telling the story of the famous old bell to her younger friends. "So now we's free," I overheard her say. Poor little child! Not yet is Freedom even for babes like you. Not till the brain and heart of the world declares for the Co-operative Commonwealth will there be anything worthy of the holy name. Socialism alone can make the world free and gladsome and beautiful — a fit dwelling for such as you.

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The anti-transgender violence goes on and on

Heavy Sigh.

Having not yet recovered from the murder of Diamond Williams, Philadelphia's trans community was rocked again on Tuesday night. A 26 year-old transwoman is reported to be in critical but stable condition at Hahnemann University Hospital after being pistol whipped and shot in the back of the head in her apartment in Northern Liberties. She is expected to survive.

The victim was found at the front door to the apartment building, having crawled there from her third floor apartment. She was able to communicate with police when they arrived after being called by neighbors. She reported that she was waiting for a family member when she heard a knock on the door. She opened it to discover a man with a gun who she did not know.

There is video here. That's the CBS coverage, which describes the victim as a woman. Early ABC coverage described the victim as a "man dressed like a woman." I saw video yesterday that identified the victim and had some interviews with family members, but it appears today to have been scrubbed from the internet.

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