Hate Violence report

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs has released its report on LGBT and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2014.

The good news is that overall anti-LGBT violence decreased by 32% from 2013. To a large extent that was due to sharp declines in New York City and Los Angeles...which may be as much related to decline in staffing programs as actual decline in incidents.

The bad news is that the number of fatal anti-LGBTQ hate crime reports increased by 11%...and the severity of the violence remained high. Especially impacted were transgender women, the LGBT and HIV-affected communities of color, and gay men.

As in the past gay men represented the largest group of survivors of hate violence. For the first time, there is data showing that low-income LGBTQ people are dis-proportionately impacted.

While the number of homicides increased by 11%, NCAVPs findings reflect a disproportionate impact of deadly violence on people of color and transgender women. 80% of all homicide victims were people of color, while people of color represented only 41% of total survivors and victims. 60% of the homicide victims were Black/African American, 15% were Latin@ and 15% White.

Over half (55%) of homicide victims were transgender women. Exactly half were transgender women of color. On the other hand transgender survivors and victims only represent 19% of the total reports. Gay and bisexual men represented 35% of the homicide victims.

In 2014 in Los Angeles and the surrounding areas alone, we lost three transgender women to deadly hate violence. Aniya Parker, Zoraida Reyes, and Deshawnda Sanchez are representative of the fatal violence that transgender women of color continue to experience in our country and around the world. Their lives deserve national action to end hate violence.

--Christopher Argyros from LA LGBT Center

The report draws on data from 16 anti-violence programs located in 14 states (Arizona, California, Illinois, Kansas, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Texas, Vermont, and Virginia).

This year’s report again shows that people at risk for the most severe hate violence are at the intersection of multiple forms of oppression and discrimination including homophobia, transphobia, racism and socioeconomic discrimination.

Anti-LGBTQ hate violence can no longer be viewed in isolation from other forms of violence that our community members are experiencing based on their identities.

--Essex Lordes, Community United Against Violence

LGBTQ and HIV-affected people of color survivors were 2.2 times more likely to experience physical violence, 1.4 times more likely to be injured, and 1.7 times more likely to require medical attention, when compared with other survivors

● LGBTQ and HIV-affected Black survivors were 2 times more likely to experience physical violence, when compared with other survivors

● LGBTQ and HIV-affected Latin@ survivors were 1.8 times more likely to experience physical violence and 1.5 times more likely to be injured as a result of hate violence, when compared with other survivors

● Transgender women survivors were 1.6 times more likely to experience physical violence and 1.6 times more likely to experience sexual violence, when compared with other survivors

● Transgender people of color survivors were 1.6 times more likely to experience any physical violence and 1.9 times more likely to require medical attention, when compared with other survivors
● Gay men survivors were 1.8 times more likely to experience injury and 1.5 times more likely to require medical attention, when compared with other survivors

● LGBTQ and HIV-affected low income survivors were 2.1 times more likely to experience hate violence at the workplace, when compared with other survivors

In the past week, a man witnessed another man smashing a transgender person's head into the pavement on Capitol Hill (Seattle), while a crowd failed to intervene, a homeless man was charged with attempted murder as a hate crime after shoving a transgender woman of color onto the subway tracks in Manhattan, and a transgender woman in Tempe, Az who only wanted to sip a soda in a bar while watching the Belmont Stakes was refused service.

'I can't serve you any drinks,' and I go, 'What? What's the problem?' And she goes, 'We don't serve your kind,' and I'm like, I didn't just hear that. And then all of a sudden, this guy, who was I guess the bouncer, walked up to me and he goes, 'You're going to have to leave.'

--Briana Sandy

Tempe Tavern at first claimed that they believed Ms. Sandy to be a prostitute. Eventually they apologized after "Internet mob mentality" forced them to do so.

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