Bangladesh

Hellraisers Journal: In Bangladesh, 200,000 garment workers protesting, factories set ablaze.

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Wednesday September 23, 1903
Cripple Creek District, Colorado - All Finns Imported as Strikebreakers Have Escaped

All of the Finns who were imported as strikebreakers last week have now managed to escape from the clutches of the military and the mine owners' gunthugs. They worked under the bayonets of the soldiers, and were forced to scab, but, to their credit, these imported strike breakers were not born to be scabs. They have been provided transportation out of the strike zone by the Western Federation of Miners.

Another rebellious worker, however, was not so lucky. Near the Strong Mine a sentry saw movement in the dark and hollered, "halt." When the the movement did not cease as commanded, the sentry opened fire. Soon all hell broke loose as other sentries joined in, firing off twenty-five shots in all. The movement in the dark turned out to be a burro, now quite dead. Bullets also came flying into two nearby houses, but we are relieved to report that none of the occupants were injured. We cannot say whether the burro was trying to make his escape, or only lost and wandering about. But the incident does point to the risks taken by those attempting to escape from the mining camps of the Cripple Creek District.

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Hellraisers Jounal: "We're coming Colorado!..Shouting the Battle Cry of Union."

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Wednesday September 16, 1903
Denver, Colorado - Big Bill Haywood, Secretary of the Western Federation of Miners

In the Denver office of the Western Federation of Miners, William D. Haywood, Secretary of the W. F. of M., is hard at work. Haywood is known simply as "Big Bill" by his fellow metal miners. He works in the office by day arranging relief for striking miners and their families, and seeking legal representation for those arrested. In the evening there are meetings to attend. Meetings for the smeltermen, Socialist Party meetings, and various union committee meetings all demand his time and attention.

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Hellraisers Journal: The little fellow cried, "Don't make me scab! I'll die first!"

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Sunday August 2, 1903
From The Comrade: Part II of "Child Slaves of Philadelphia" by John Spargo

One of the effects of child labor, the illiteracy of adults, I have observed here and in the surrounding towns and villages to a much greater extent than anywhere else in this country. It is by no means an uncommon thing to meet native born Americans of twenty-five years of age, or over, unable to read or write even their own names! What a terrible price to pay for the folly and crime of child labor!

Of course, the first break in the ranks of the strikers took place among the children. Poor children! they entered upon the strike with light hearts. To them it meant a chance to rest; to straighten their little backs. But they were in most cases easily browbeaten by the brutal bosses or their agents. I heard of several cases where mothers took their children — literally dragged them — to the mill gates and forced them inside to "scab." One little fellow I heard of was dragged and beaten by his mother right up to the mill door when he was roughly pulled inside by a bully of a foreman who hurled a volley of curses at the cowering child.. And the burden of the little fellow's cry was "Don't make me scab! I'll die first! Don't make me scab!"

Morally Philadelphia seems to be quite dead. There seems to be no means of rousing it to a sense of shame. "Corrupt and content" in political affairs, it is cruel and content in industrial affairs. Only now, among the textile workers themselves, is there any sign of moral revolt against the infamy of robbing the children of their childhood for profit. There are numerous "reform" societies in the city; there is no dearth of churches or preachers; there is an oversupply of "charitable institutions." But here, as elsewhere, only a small, but happily growing, band of workers — a few Socialists and others whose consciences have been quickened by Socialist propaganda — dare protest against the ruthless slaughter of the children. They alone affirm the right of every child to a free, unhindered access to life's riches of health and joy.

One morning recently I saw a group of small children gazing with awed reverence at the old "Liberty Bell" in the historic "Independence Hall." One little girl of perhaps nine or ten summers had evidently been telling the story of the famous old bell to her younger friends. "So now we's free," I overheard her say. Poor little child! Not yet is Freedom even for babes like you. Not till the brain and heart of the world declares for the Co-operative Commonwealth will there be anything worthy of the holy name. Socialism alone can make the world free and gladsome and beautiful — a fit dwelling for such as you.

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Hellraisers Journal: Bangladesh losing its duty-free trade privileges with US

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Monday June 29, 1903
San Francisco, California - Solidarity between men and women yields strike victory!

An agreement has been reached between the striking Bindery Women's Union and their employers. Claiming victory, the women returned to work this morning. The Union Women won the wage scale of $10 that they were demanding. The men of the Bookbinders Union have been striking in sympathy with the Women's Union. When news of this victory reached them, they declared their sympathy strike off, and they also returned to work this morning.

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Hellraisers Journal: "Starvation Stalks Through Paterson"

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Saturday June 27, 1903
From The Appeal to Reason: "Populism and Socialism"


Ernest Untermann, 1902

In the current issue of the Appeal, Ernest Untermann examines the political differences and shared goals of the People's Party and the Socialist Party of America. We offer a few excerpts from that article:

From the standpoint of the Socialist, the People's party platform aims at symptoms without removing the cause. Changes in the money system will not bring the money into the pockets of the worker, as long as production is for profit under the control of the capitalist class. Prohibition of alien ownership of land will not lessen the exploitation of the farmers by the trusts; a graduated income tax, if it could be enacted and enforced, would not help any working man, because the capitalists can shift the burden of taxation to the shoulders of the working class by increasing the prices of all the products.

The universal eight hour day and a minimum wage can be met by the capitalist in the same way. Universal suffrage and the election of the president, vice president and United States senators, by the direct vote of the people, will be useless, as long as the working men elect capitalist politicians, and leave the political and economic power in the control of the capitalist class. Government ownership of the railroads, telegraphs and telephones, under the control of capitalist parties, is an increase of power for the capitalists. The only really revolutionary statement in the People's party platform is that wealth shall belong to him who produces it; but the framers of that platform forgot to explain how the producer could obtain this wealth and be secured in its possession...

But the populists correctly stated that interests of the rural and urban workers are identical. If they had added that these interests are also distinct from, and opposed to, the interests of all rural and urban capitalists, they would not have consented to a fusion with the very class which they are organized to defeat.

Comrade Untermann goes on to propose that the Populist should become Socialist and vote the Socialist Party ticket.

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Hellraisers Journal: Hunger! the great strikebreaker, 1000 weavers return to work in Paterson

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Wednesday June 24, 1903
From The New York Times: "Garment Workers Threaten Strike"

About thirty-five thousand members of the Garment Workers' Council threatened a general strike in this city to enforce a demand for a new wage schedule for the summer trade. The unions affected include those of coat tailors, vest makers, and knee breeches makers. A conference will be held in a few days between committees of the clothing manufacturers and the Garment Workers' Council in the interest of peace.

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Hellraisers Journal: Mansions built on "quivering hearts and drooping heads of these children."

You..ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Wednesday June 17, 1903
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - Mother Jones Will Parade Striking Children to City Hall

Mother Jones is in this city where 100,000 Textile Workers are on strike, 16,000 of them children. Mother Jones considers child labor to be the worst of the industrial sins. She will lead a parade of striking textile workers to City Hall today with the striking children in the lead. She states that she will demonstrate that:

Philadelphia's mansions were built on the broken bones, the quivering hearts and drooping heads of these children.

She has been at the Textile Union Headquarters where she reports seeing:

Little children..some with their hands off, some with the thumb missing, some with their fingers off at the knuckle..stooped little things, round shouldered and skinny.

Meanwhile, The Wellsboro Gazette published this news item today:

War has been declared on child labor by the authorities in this state. The great textile strike in Philadelphia disclosed conditions that are astounding in this particular, showing that there has been perjury relative to the ages of children employed. State factory inspectors are instructed to hereafter demand a birth or baptismal certificate with every minor's application for work and the next Legislature is expected to pass a law making it unlawful to employ any child under fourteen years of age at labor in any factory, store, shop or mine and requiring in any case a certificate of the record of birth for every minor child.

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Hellraisers Journal: Standing Together in Bentonville! #WalmartStrikers & Bangladeshi Workers

Sunday June 7, 1903
Chicago, Illinois - Dainty Lady Blows Whistle, Calls Girls Out On Strike

Leo Schultz who was arrested yesterday at the Athletic Club while calling the workers there out on strike, was released later in the evening after paying bail of $700. He returned to the Restaurant Employees Union Hall where he was met by wild cheering.

Meanwhile, the Siegal, Cooper & Co. restaurant was having its own problems. A well-dressed, silk-parasol carrying Miss Chilton entered this fine establishment and seated herself for lunch. She then took out a small whistle, and blew it in a most unladylike manner. "Come on girls," she shouted, "a strike is on."

The girls answered the call and began to file out. At the elevator a forewoman threw her arms around one of the girls and begged her to come back. The girl striker replied:

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Hellraisers Journal: Mother Jones to Speak at Carnegie Hall

You..ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Wednesday May 27, 1903
Philladelphia, Pennsylvania - Four Kensington Textile Mills Are On Strike

The demand is for a 55 hour week, and the strike date had been set for Monday June 1. However, hearing that the textile manufacturers are refusing to grant any concessions, four of the textile mills in Kensington went out on strike today. The Central Textile Workers Union will meet tonight. All of the crafts in the various textile industries will be represented. We can expect that a a general strike call will be issued, and that the date for the strike will be moved up. As many as 100,000 workers could be on strike by the end of this week. Of that number, 16,000 of those strikers would be children under 16 years of age.

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Hellraisers Journal: Congressman George Miller to visit Bangladesh

You..ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

Tuesday May 26, 1903
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - Big Textile Strike Set for June 1

Executives from fourteen branches of the textile manufacturing industry met recently and decided that they would not negotiate with their employees. Hearing this, the Carpet Weavers held a mass meeting to take up the matter of issuing a strike call. The 1500 men present voted two to one to go out on strike. They set the date for June 1. The strike will close 65 mills in Philadelphia, and will idle about 6000 workers.

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