company towns

Hellraisers Journal: Labor Groups Moving Forward Together With Moral Monday Protests in Raleigh

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Monday September 28, 1903
Ely, Nevada - Three Union Men Gunned Down by Superintendent

We are hearing reports that three union men have been gunned down in cold blood by a company official in Ely, Nevada. The union men were chosen by their fellow workers as a committee to present the demands of the union to the company. They were shot down and killed as they approached the office in an effort to seek a meeting. The superintendent used a Winchester rifle to murder our three unarmed brothers. The superintendent fled the scene and no attempt has been made to apprehend him.

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Hellraisers Journal: The Long Reach of Walmart, The Thai Shrimp Industry

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Saturday September 26, 1903
Cripple Creek District, Colorado - Military Arrests Continue, Union Men Remain in Bullpen

Just in case our readers believe that the military bullpen was emptied by the release of the four union men a few days ago, let us state here and now that striking miners and some of their supporters remain in the clutches of the military. General round-ups continue in the area and are so numerous that we are unable to keep track of those arrested, released, and re-arrested.

We list just a few:
Miners Frey, Johnson, Beckman and Poole were arrested last week and released a few days later. Joe Lynch, not a miner, but the marshal of Independence, and deemed too friendly with the union, has been arrested and released. William Dodsworth, president of No. 32 of W. F. of M., was also taken, held without charge, and released. More striking miners have been arrested, and are being held in the bullpen under appalling conditions without charge nor access to counsel.

An attempt was made to round-up the miners of Altman, but the military burst through the door of their union hall only to find it empty. The miners had been tipped-off, and left early before the hall was surrounded by 200 soldiers.

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Hellraisers Journal: In Bangladesh, 200,000 garment workers protesting, factories set ablaze.

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Wednesday September 23, 1903
Cripple Creek District, Colorado - All Finns Imported as Strikebreakers Have Escaped

All of the Finns who were imported as strikebreakers last week have now managed to escape from the clutches of the military and the mine owners' gunthugs. They worked under the bayonets of the soldiers, and were forced to scab, but, to their credit, these imported strike breakers were not born to be scabs. They have been provided transportation out of the strike zone by the Western Federation of Miners.

Another rebellious worker, however, was not so lucky. Near the Strong Mine a sentry saw movement in the dark and hollered, "halt." When the the movement did not cease as commanded, the sentry opened fire. Soon all hell broke loose as other sentries joined in, firing off twenty-five shots in all. The movement in the dark turned out to be a burro, now quite dead. Bullets also came flying into two nearby houses, but we are relieved to report that none of the occupants were injured. We cannot say whether the burro was trying to make his escape, or only lost and wandering about. But the incident does point to the risks taken by those attempting to escape from the mining camps of the Cripple Creek District.

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Hellraisers Journal: Strike of Colorado City Smeltermen Continues

Thursday, March 12, 1903
Colorado City, Colorado-The strike of the smeltermen has shut down all three of Colorado City's mills for the past three weeks. The smelter owners have rejected all the demands of the Western Federation of Miners: an eight-hour day, union recognition, and the rehiring of the fired men. It was the firing of twenty-three men for union organizing by J. D. Hawkins which caused the walk out. The WFM is an industrial union and therefore, Union President, Charles Moyer and Secretary-Treasurer, Bill Haywood, believe that the smeltermen belong in the same union with the metal miners. These leaders also believe that the smeltermen deserve the same rate of pay. Currently, the miners make about $3.00 for an eight hour day, while the smeltermen make about $1.80 for a twelve hour day, leaving them so impoverished that many must live in tents even through the Colorado winter.

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