Ludlow

Hellraisers Journal: Eighteen Hundred Men, Women, & Children Come Marching to Greet Militia

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Sunday November 1, 1903
Cripple Creek District, Colorado - Women's Auxiliaries Receive Charters from C. F. of L.

Last month the women of the strike zone began organize themselves to fight alongside their men. Women's Auxiliaries were formed in Cripple Creek, Victor and Anaconda, and they have all been granted charters by the Colorado State Federation of Labor. They are making their presence known by providing relief for families of strikers who are sick or otherwise in need.

Business men who are in any way connected with the Citizens' Alliance have had to sit up and take notice for these women have declared that they will not patronize businesses so connected. Many business have already hung out the white flag of surrender, promising to end that relationship. General Bell may yet meet his match as the women of the Cripple Creek District continue to organize.

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Hellraisers Journal: Fighting Continues near Ludlow Colony as Blizzard Buries Strikers' Tents

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Wednesday October 28, 1903
From The Wall Street Journal: A Review of John Mitchell's Book, "Organized Labor"

John Mitchell, about 1903
President John Mitchell,
United Mine Workers of America

Prominently placed in today's issue of The Journal is a long review of "Organized Labor," the recently released book by Mr. Mitchell. The review takes up a full column of the front page and about a quarter of a second column, and contains a surprising amount of praise for the labor leader, if not for all of his ideas:

Mr. John Mitchell, president of the united mine workers of America, has published a book entitled "Organized Labor." It is interesting, first because its subject is now uppermost in the attention of the public, and secondly, because its author has within a year loomed large in the public eye, by reason of the great anthracite coal miners' strike of 1902. Mr. Mitchell's book, therefore, deserves more than the merely perfunctory and passing notices which it has received in the press generally...

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Hellraisers Journal: Red-neck Miners of Ludlow Tent Colony Continue to Defend Their Families

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Tuesday October 27, 1903
From The Indianapolis News: U. M. W. of A. Vice-Pres. Lewis Back From West Virginia

The troubles on Campbell Creek in West Virginia appear to be settled, according to this article which appeared yesterday in The Indianapolis News:

Vice-President Thomas Lewis, of the United Mine Workers of America, has returned from the Kanawha district of West Virginia, where he succeeded in effecting a settlement of the troubles at Campbell Creek between the miners and the operators. The operators have agreed to the Huntington (W. Va.) scale, which was signed last April, and which virtually means that the Campbell Creek miners will have their old scale of wages, but will enjoy several concessions in regard to weighers and similar matters. There were three hundred miners affected by the settlement.

President John Mitchell, Vice-President Lewis and Secretary William B. Wilson will leave the city to-morrow to attend the celebration of Mitchell's day in Pennsylvania. Mr. Mitchell will go to Scranton, Mr. Lewis to Minersville, and Mr. Wilson to Hazelton.

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Hellraisers Journal: Coeur D' Alene scabs arrive in Victor, Colorado, on morning train.

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Wednesday October 14, 1903
Victor, Colorado -Scabs arrive on morning train from Coeur D' Alene, Idaho


Ed Boyce
First President of the
Western Federation of Miners

Scabs shipped in from Coeur D' Alene arrived on the morning train today, and were met at the station by a large crowd. We feel justified in calling them scabs since, no doubt, word of the strike has reached Coeur D' Alene by this time. These scabs betray the memory of their two brothers who were shot down by mine guards on June 11, 1892 during the strike of that year. No miner from Coeur D' Alene could be so ill informed as not to know that it was that strike which led directly to founding of the Western Federation of Miners.

Over 600 suffered arrest and confinement in the filthy bullpen. Thirteen, including Ed Boyce, former W. F. of M. President, were imprisoned in the Ada County Jail in Boise. It was there that this great industrial union was conceived. The W. F. of M. was founded in Butte, Montana, in May of 1893. Every western miner knows this history. Therefore, we will say it again, these new arrivals are scabs of the worst sort. Traitors plain and simple.

In other news from Denver, Governor Peabody has ordered the reduction of the military force in the Cripple Creek District. There are at present 775 officers and men on duty in the strike zone, and that number will soon be reduced to 500.

Brigadier General Chase has been formally charged and placed under arrest in Denver. His court-martial is pending. The Governor is expected to release the General soon while he awaits the trial. Several others have also been charged and placed under arrest.

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Hellraisers Journal: As the coal operators ship in machine guns, Colorado miners prepare for attack.

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Monday October 12, 1903
From the International Socialist Review: "The Legal Fiction of Equality."

In a long article for this month's Review, Comrade Clarence Meily writes about the capitalistic courts and the struggle of the working class for true democracy, industrial democracy. We quote only a small section here to focus on what the employers are fond of calling "assumed risk." Meily begins the article with a quote from Judge Gray:

"There are no classes In America. I hate the name!" Judge George Gray, quoted in the "Outlook" of July 4, 1903.

Meily then goes on to discuss "assumed risk," which leaves the employer free of legal responsibility when employees are killed or injured on the job, concluding:

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Hellraisers Journal: Gunthugs attack Ludlow Tent Colony once again, shoot and kill Mack Powell

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Saturday October 10, 1903
Denver, Colorado - Governor Peabody's court-martial board to convene in nine days.

Governor Peabody has appointed a court-martial which is set to convene on October 19th at 10:00 a. m. Many charges against high officers have been brought to the Governor's attention, reaching as high as General Chase, according to some reports. General Chase remains in Denver at this time.

General Bell has released several statements over the last few days. This is an example:

I offer the following moral to the Citizen's Alliance, the Mine Owners' Association, the Western Federation of Miners, and all other organizations: Moral-Attend to your own business affairs and don't in any manner or way interfere or mix in the military operations and conduct of the troops, and, incidentally, with the management and operation of the military affairs in the Cripple Creek district.

Bell further states that the organizations so-named should pin that moral into their hatbands. In other words, the citizens should shut their mouths and open their wallets to foot the bill for Bell's shoddy management of the Colorado National Guard in the Cripple Creek District.

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Hellraisers Journal: Gunthugs open fire on Ludlow Tent Colony; Miners rally to defend the camp.

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Thursday October 8, 1903
Denver, Colorado - Governor Peabody Orders Court-Martial to Investigate Charges

With persistent rumors of a widespread scandal within the Colorado state militia related to the Cripple Creek campaign, Governor Peabody released the following statement:

Charges and specifications against certain men and officers of the Colorado National Guard have been filed with me which will be immediately inquired into.

They are charges of a most serious nature, and I shall order a court-martial to investigate them thoroughly...

Gen. Chase has not been removed, but he will remain in Denver for present.

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Hellraisers Journal: Louis Tikas Moves into the Ludlow Tent Colony as Leader of the Camp

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Tuesday October 6, 1903
From The International Socialist Review: S. P. of A. Organizing Work Progressing

In the current issue of the Review, William Mailly, National Secretary of the Socialist Party of America, discusses plans to increase the Party's national organizing work:

The contribution of one thousand dollars by Comrade J. A. Wayland of the Appeal to Reason to the National Organizing Fund comes in good season. It comes at a time when most needed and when it can be put to the best uses for the Socialist Party, which is the concrete expression of the Socialist movement in America. While it is no exaggeration to say that the organizing work carried on by the National Socialist Party during the past eight months has exceeded that performed in any similar length of time before, yet even this was not all that was needed or desired to be done. It is simple enough to inaugurate a work of this kind; the great difficulty comes in continuing it after it has begun. It was quite impossible to satisfy all sections requiring or asking for organizers at once and the same time. The number of organizers employed was not sufficient to go around, the territory to be covered too large, and the resources of the national office too limited....

Comrade Mailly describes specific organizers to be hired and territories to be covered. Several state organizers will be hired as national organizers, thereby giving the more experienced national organizers smaller territories to cover. A plan is being developed to cover most of the country:

A study of these plans will show that within the next six months every state and territory will have received visits from national organizers or will be supporting organizers of their own. Comrades must bear in mind that every place cannot be visited AT ONCE. The national office cannot assume financial responsibility for any more organizers than it can afford to support. It is most important that the party be kept out of debt. But every place will finally be visited, if the comrades will but realize the immensity of the task we have undertaken and be patient with us.

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Hellraisers Journal: 1300 Men, Women, and Children Establish a New Village at the Ludlow Tent Colony

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Friday October 2, 1903
Cripple Creek District, Colorado - Woods Investment Forced to Close the Gold Coin

The Woods Investment Company has been forced by virtue of their membership in the Mine Owners Association to close the Gold Coin Mine. Mr. Woods has long been satisfied with work of the union miners employed there, however, the Mine Owners Association now requires all those affiliated with the Association to work their property with employees who are not members of the Western Federation of Miners.

Just this past Wednesday evening, Mr. Woods, himself, met the miners as they ended their shift at the Gold Coin Mine. He explained to them that each of them would be required to drop his membership in the W. F. of M. in order to remain employed at the mine.

Not one single miner would agree to become a scab, and the Gold Coin Mine was shut down. A committee of the miners was sent to the Economic Mill, also owned by Woods. The men working there, when informed of events at the Gold Coin, promptly walked out. Not one remained behind.

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Hellraisers Journal: Evicted Families Arrive at Ludlow as Rain Turns to Snow

You ought to be out raising hell. This is the fighting age. Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones

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Thursday September 24, 1903
Cripple Creek, Colorado - "This is no longer a constitutional court," General Engley.

Thus, spoke General Engley as he rose in the courtroom of Judge Seeds yesterday on behalf of the four miners who found themselves, yet again, hauled into court bound and shackled and surrounded by soldiers.

On Tuesday, the counsel for the military managed to delay proceedings until the next day. On Wednesday, yesterday, General Chase appeared in Cripple Creek surrounded by his usual display of military might: infantry, cavalry, sharpshooters on rooftops, and a Gatling gun pointed at the train depot.

The four miners, James Lafferty, C. H. McKinney , Charles Campbell, and Sherman Parker, were escorted into the court room, heavily shackled, with a line of infantry on each side. More soldiers followed with their bayonets on full display.

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