Gender development

Vanessa LoBue, assistant professor of psychology at Rutgers-Newark, has contributed an article at The Conversation that was forwarded to me: When do children develop their gender identity?

It turns out that for young children, initial concepts about gender are quite flexible. In my own research, I’ve found that children don’t begin to notice and adopt gender-stereotyped behaviors (e.g., preferring colors like pink or blue) until the age of two or three. A few years later, their concept of gender becomes quite rigid, and although it becomes more relaxed by middle childhood, even adults have trouble going back to thinking about gender as something that’s flexible.




Existing Beyond Theory

While many of the essays I have written over the years have a footing firmly based in emotions, I have explored the theory of transgender from time to time. Let's face it: some people are not going to accept that transpeople are not just crazy loons unless they have some "solid evidence."

Unfortunately, what people consider to be solid evidence has a wide variance.

In January of 2011 I shared a review of the literature. Since most of "the literature" comes from psychological research, that won't be good enough for some people. Since I live with a graduate professor involved in educating and mentoring doctoral researchers, I'm sure we might disagree on that point.

This literature review is not up to her graduate school standards. I have not included an annotated bibliography in APA style. I'm only a layperson when it comes to psychology.

My actual purpose (and hope) is to get people to read it, especially the people who need the information presented this way. Well, that and making a few corrections so that it properly fits into my autobiography thingy.

I'll get started on the other side.

The graphic above is called Faces.


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