Health Care

Duke University Hospital opens new gender clinic

Duke University Health System of Durham, NC has created a new clinic to treat children and teems with gender identity and development issues.

 photo Hunter_zpsztpcxong.jpgThe clinic will address young people who are transgender or intersex as well as those who may have genital development or puberty issues.

The link above provides some background through the story of Hunter Schafer, one of Duke's patients.

 

 

 

 

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AIDS Conference Interruptus

 

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The 2015 US Conference on AIDS was held September 10-13 in Washington, DC. On the opening day dozens of transgender and gender-nonconforming people seized the stage at the lunchtime plenary session to draw attention to HIV+ gender-variant people.

The group was chanting, We are not gay men! to protest the inclusion of trans women in gay male research and statistics.

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Trans woman denied healthcare

Minnesota resident Nova Bradford, 21, had a chemical dependency problem, which she wanted to get help with, so she tried to gain admission to the University of Minnesota Medical Center's Lodging Plus substance abuse treatment program.

You can recover from chemical addiction and live a fuller life. To do so, you most likely will need support or assistance. Our services include assessment, medically supervised detoxification, inpatient and outpatient evaluation and referral, inpatient-to-outpatient treatment, family counseling and aftercare. Working with us, you’ll recover physically, psychologically, interpersonally and spiritually.

As it turns out the use of the word "you" in the above was overly broad.

Nova was refused admission because she is a transgender woman. Fairview Health Services, which operates UMMC informed her that it would be inappropriate to accept her into the program because there were separate floors for male and female residents and "because they have open showers."

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The social costs of denying health care for transfolk

For background you might read Joan McCarter's How bad is health insurance for trans people? Really, really bad.

A new nationwide survey measures the social cost of health care providers denying care to transgender people.

As a result of being denied insurance coverage for transition-related medical care, 35% of survey respondents reported needing psychotherapy, 23% became unemployed, 15% attempted suicide, 15% ended up on public assistance programs and 14% became homeless.

The report also discovered that 37% of respondents who were denied care turned to drugs and/or alcohol and 36% developed other physical symptoms.

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HHS settles discrimination complaint with The Brooklyn Hospital Center

The HHS office of Civil Rights and The Brooklyn Hospital Center have announced a landmark voluntary settlement agreement that establishes a "new standard for appropriate policies and procedures to ensure privacy and appropriate care of transgender patients.

OCR’s agreement with The Brooklyn Hospital Center (TBHC) was prompted by allegations that it violated an antidiscrimination provision in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) when it assigned “a transgender female who presented as a female at the hospital…to a double occupancy patient room with a male occupant.”

Under the terms of a two-year settlement, TBHC agreed to adopt, and train employees, on new policies and procedures tailored to transgender patients that address everything from admitting and rooming to documenting patients’ “legal and a preferred name” and their “gender and/or transgender status, if the Patient has identified that status and agrees that it should be recorded.” Employees also are to become familiar with terms such as “gender non-conformity” and “sex assigned at birth.”

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Transgender medical crises

Video.

Not every transgender person seeks a medical transition. Surgery is financially unreachable for many. It can be medically contraindicated for some. And some just do not desire it or find it to be necessary to living a fulfilling life.

But those who do seek a surgical transition encounter a major problem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TSSurgeryGuide.com lists fewer than 30 physicians who offer sexual reassignment surgery, mostly located on the coasts.

While a few more surgeons might not have been listed, that number is probably in the ballpark, according to medical professionals who told America Tonight that people who are transgender are dangerously underserved by the medical system, especially when it comes to surgical specialties.

I remember getting a phone call in my office on day from the chief of surgery, who was screaming at me on the other end of the line, saying – and I’ll never forget this – he said, ‘Don’t you even think about bringing those freaks into my hospital!’ So, that’s what I was dealing with when I started this.

--Dr. John Taylor, Red Bank, New Jersey

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Transgender health research announcements

It has been reported that new research has found that transgender patients face no higher risk of breast cancer than the general population.

Medical researcher George Brown, MD, of Mountain Home VA Medical Center in Johnson City, TN has sifted through the medical records of veterans from 1998-2013 and identified 10 cases of breast cancer in transgender people.

Brown discovered that breast cancers of people who were declared male at birth tended to be more advanced tan those of people who were declared female at birth.

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The low cost of transgender troops

The New England Journal of Medicine's current issue includes an analysis by Aaron Belkin, Ph. D., director of the Palm Center and political science professor at San Francisco State University: Caring for Our Transgender Troops --The Negligible Cost of Transition-Related Care.

With Mike Huckabee basically decrying the potential medical cost of having transgender troops serve this country, Belkin decided to estimate how much we were talking about. Being a retired math professor, I couldn't resist double-checking Belkin's calculations.

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Lack of rights associated with adverse health outcomes

Milbank Quarterly is a healthcare policy journal published four times a year by John Wiley & Sons. The lead article in the most recent edition is Legal Protections in Public Accommodations Settings: A Critical Public Health Issue for Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming People. This study examined the healthcare consequences of the 2012 Massachusetts law which provided legal protections against discrimination on the basis of gender identity in employment, housing, public education and business, but not in public accommodations such as transportation, retail stores, restaurants, health care facilities and bathrooms.

In 2013 452 transgender or gender nonconforming adults were interviewed for the survey, aged 18 to 75. The survey found that discrimination in public venues was not only common but associated with adverse health outcomes (abstract).

Lead researcher for the study was Dr. Sari Reisner of The Fenway Institute and Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health with colleagues from Yale School of Public Health, Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University, Wagner School of Public Service at New York University, and Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition.

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