Dem. Representatives petition the TSA on behalf of trans passengers

In the wake of the September 21 harassment by TSA officers of transgender women Shadi Petosky at Orlando International Airport for having a "genital anomaly", 32 members of Congress have demanded answers from Transportation Security Chief Peter Neffenger.

While we understand the importance of vigilant airport security, we cannot countenance a security protocol that subjects transgender travelers to this level of indignity. To that end, we urge TSA to complete a thorough review of its current procedures and address any shortcomings that may, however unintentionally, subject transgender travelers to inequitable or improper treatment by security personnel.

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The Breakfast Club (Al be back)

Welcome to The Breakfast Club! We're a disorganized group of rebel lefties who hang out and chat if and when we're not too hungover  we've been bailed out we're not too exhausted from last night's (CENSORED) the caffeine kicks in. Join us every weekday morning at 9am (ET) and weekend morning at 10:30am (ET) to talk about current news and our boring lives and to make fun of LaEscapee! If we are ever running late,
it's PhilJD's fault. 

 

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Human Rights Watch, UN Human Rights Office challenge Malaysian Federal Court ruling

 photo Jina_zps4vpbhvna.jpgOn October 8 the Malaysian Federal Court reversed a lower court ruling that the state of Negeri Sembilan's prohibition on cross-dressing was unconstitutional. On entirely technical grounds, the Federal Court upheld Sharia law that prohibits "a male person posing as a woman."

The judicial decision is a serious setback in a four-year struggle by transgender activists to end arbitrary arrests of transgender women on the basis of discriminatory laws.

--Human Rights Watch

This Federal Court ruling is a major setback for transgender rights.

Trans women in Malaysia, who were buoyed by the landmark lower court decision recognizing their rights to be themselves, have been let down once again.

--Neela Ghoshal, Human Rights Watch

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Marking the Day

 photo hannaharmy_zps70mdnsju.jpgIt's National Coming Out Day...not just here but also in the UK.

In order to mark the day there Captain Hannah Winterbourne, Britain's most senior transgender army officer has spoken out, primarily speaking about the importance, at least in her life, of participation in sports.

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The Breakfast Club (Europe)

 

Welcome to The Breakfast Club! We're a disorganized group of rebel lefties who hang out and chat if and when we're not too hungover  we've been bailed out we're not too exhausted from last night's (CENSORED) the caffeine kicks in. Join us every weekday morning at 9am (ET) and weekend morning at 10:30am (ET) to talk about current news and our boring lives and to make fun of LaEscapee! If we are ever running late, it's PhilJD's fault. 

 

 

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Location, Location, Location

Back when I lived in Arkansas (1984-2000), I would frequently be told, upon seeing outrageous behavior on the part of one of that state's citizens, "You've got to remember, This is Arkansas." As if that simple statement implied that Arkansans were not subject to the laws of the United States or the societal expectation of Planet Earth.

It frustrated me no end.

It got so I would say

Arkansas is a really beautiful place to live, except for the people who live there.

I imagine people in other places may have similar stories...or perhaps, ones that are in total opposition.

The news spins:

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How to keep trans people alive

Of course the first part of this is...or should be...quite obvious. How about people stop murdering trans women of color?

It's time to do more than just solve each homicide as they happen. It's time to do more than just arrest these horrific people who commit these violent crimes. It's time to do the work beforehand.

--Nellie Fitzpatrick, mayor's liaison to the LGBT community in Philadelphia

It is not enough to light candles.

--Suffok, MA, District Attorney DanConley

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of course being murdered is only one of the leading causes of our demise. Another one is suicide.

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Down by the banks of the River Charles

They are debating our rights again in Massachusetts. I hate when that happens. It always makes me feel so scummy.

The legislators are discussing H. 1577 and S. 735 which would increase the scope of the current anti-discrimination laws to protect transgender people in public places.

Currently it is illegal to refuse to hire someone who is transgender but totally legal to refuse to provide service to that same person.

Massachusetts lawmakers in 2011 passed a law adding transgender individuals to the list of protected classes from employment or housing discrimination, but stopped short of including public accommodations protections. Other states — 17 in total — have passed similar laws offering such expanded protections.

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Completing a Score

 photo KieshaJenkins_zpsp1u3toie.jpgKiesha Jenkins lived in North Philadelphia. At Oh-Dark-Thirty Tuesday morning, Keisha got a ride from someone to Hunting Park in Logan.

Upon exiting the vehicle Keisha was surrounded by five or six men who proceeded to beat her. Then one of the men took out a gun and shot her twice in the back.

When police arrived, they rushed Keisha to a hospital, where she was later declared dead.

The twenty-two year old transgender woman is the twentieth transgender woman in the US known to have been murdered this year.

Right now we don't have any motive. We don't know if it's potentially a hate crime or if it was a robbery. We really don't know. It's too early in the investigation to tell.

--Philadelphia Police Captain James Clark

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Shivi can come home

A week and a half ago I shared the story of Shivi, a transman who is a student at Cal-Berkeley and whose parents tried to arrange a marriage for him with a man in India, to "fix his sexuality." (Parents traffic their child to India as attempted cure for the trans). Though Shivi was born in India, he has lived in the US since the age of three.

When last we saw, Shivi (who only uses the one name) was stuck in India because his mother had stolen his passport, green card and cellphone, and returned to the US with his siblings). His father, a researcher in the US, tried to enroll him as a girl at Dayalbagh University in Agra. But Shivi got access to her grandparents internet and contacted friends in the US who put him in touch with the LGBT NGO Nazarya. Members of Nazaraya helped Shivi escape from Agra and go to Delhi, where he filed a petition with the Delhi High Court claiming he had been wronged by his parents. The High Court found in his favor and granted Shivi an order of protection.

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